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Prague Travel & Vacations
Prague is regarded by many as one of the world's most beautiful cities, Prague has arguably become the most popular travel destination in Central Europe. Millions of tourists visit the city every year. Prague travel information, Prague travel guide, Prague hotels, Prague vacations, flights to Prague.

Regarded by many as one of the world's most beautiful cities, Prague has arguably become the most popular travel destination in Central Europe. Millions of tourists visit the city every year.

The Vltava river runs through the Czech capital, which is home to about 1.2 million people.

Prague was founded in the later 9th century, and soon became the seat of Bohemian kings, some of which ruled as emperors of the Holy Roman Empire. The city thrived under the rule of Charles IV, who ordered the building of the New Town in the 14th century - many of the city's most important attractions date back to that age. The city also went under Habsburg rule and became the capital of a province of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. In 1918, after World War I, the city became the capital of Czechoslovakia. In 1992, its historic centre was included in UNESCO's World Heritage List. In 1993, Czechoslovakia split into two countries and Prague became capital city of the new Czech Republic.

After 1989 many foreigners, especially young people, have moved to Prague.

Prague may be beautiful, but pollution often hovers over the city thanks to its location in the Vltava River basin. Many Praguers have a small cottage (which can range from a shack barely large enough for garden utensils to an elaborate, multi-storey dwelling) outside the city. There they can escape for some fresh air and country pursuits such as mushroom hunting and gardening. These cottages, called chatas, are treasured both as getaways and ongoing projects. Each reflects its owners' character, as most of them were built by unorthodox methods. There were no Home Depots under communism. Chata owners used the typically Czech "it's who you know" chain of supply to scrounge materials and services. This barter system worked extremely well, and still does today. Chaty (pl. of chata) are also sometimes used as primary residences by Czechs who rent out their city-center apartments for enormous profit to foreigners who can afford to pay inflated rent.

Public transportation is very convenient in most of the areas visitors are likely to frequent. There are three main subway lines (Czech: metro), and numerous bus and tram (streetcar) lines. Purchase 75 minutes transfer for 20 CZK ticket at any tobacco shop or 24-hours, 3-days or 7-days tickets at ticket offices in some metro stations; date stamp this the first time you ride. Tickets are not checked upon boarding, but undercover inspectors frequently make the rounds asking to see your ticket. Even though freeriding seems easy in Prague, you should invest in the cheap ticket; staying more than two days in Prague will guarantee that you will be checked.

Public transport continues at night in a convenient way. Night trams or night buses (00:00 to 5:00 AM) come usally every 30 minutes. Every 15 minutes they are leaving some night trams central exchange station in the centre of Prague called Lazarská. You can also easily change the tram lines here.

Pubs abound throughout Prague, and indeed are an important part of local culture. A green sign hanging outside an establishment indicates excellent Czech beer is to be had inside. Most pubs serve only a small selection of beers. Locals seldom pay more than 25 crowns for a half liter glass, while tourist traps often charge 50 crowns or more.

Be careful of the taxi drivers, particularly from the train station. Some of them delight in overcharging tourists. Usually it's better to call a radio-cab. Be also aware of your belongings when using crowded street-cars in the centre because of the pickpocket gangs. Especially dangerous in this aspect are lines 22 and 23.

Only change money at a trustworthy place. As soon as you arrive there will be people trying to get you to exchange money with them. The money they'll give you is Slovakian or Romanian currency which is worth much less. Never change money in the streets.

Be cautious when people offer you great deals on accommodations. Often these are freelance agents who don't actually own the rooms they're offering. It's a good idea to give the payment for the room directly to the owner of the room, and not to the agent.

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Old Town Square
Astronomical Clock
Lady of our Tyn Church
Prague Castle
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Charles Bridge
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St. Vitus Cathedral
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Old Town Square
Astronomical Clock
Lady of our Tyn Church
Prague Castle
Wenceslas Square
Vysehrad
Charles Bridge
Bethleham Chapel
St. Vitus Cathedral
Mucha Museum
Old Town Square
Astronomical Clock
Lady of our Tyn Church
Prague Castle
Wenceslas Square
Vysehrad
Charles Bridge
Bethleham Chapel
St. Vitus Cathedral
Mucha Museum
Old Town Square
Astronomical Clock
Lady of our Tyn Church
Prague Castle
Wenceslas Square
Vysehrad
Charles Bridge
Bethleham Chapel
St. Vitus Cathedral
Mucha Museum
Old Town Square
Astronomical Clock
Lady of our Tyn Church
Prague Castle
Wenceslas Square
Vysehrad
Charles Bridge
Bethleham Chapel
St. Vitus Cathedral
Mucha Museum
Old Town Square
Astronomical Clock
Lady of our Tyn Church
Prague Castle
Wenceslas Square
Vysehrad
Charles Bridge
Bethleham Chapel
St. Vitus Cathedral
Mucha Museum
Old Town Square
Astronomical Clock
Lady of our Tyn Church
Prague Castle
Wenceslas Square
Vysehrad
Charles Bridge
Bethleham Chapel
St. Vitus Cathedral
Mucha Museum
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